Humanist
AnishKapoor.jpg

ChichesterHumanistsPoster2019A

Chichester Humanists is a local branch of West Sussex Humanists and represents the interests of the non-religious residents in and around Chichester.

Each month we discuss issues concerning religion and belief, ethics, equality, human rights and science, including current events.

We liase with Chichester District Council and West Sussex County Council on matters concerning equality of religion and belief, and monitor Council activities, including proposals for new "faith" schools.

We are keen to campaign on behalf of non-religious residents who feel disadvantaged because of their beliefs, e.g. access to a community school, discrimination at work or through the delivery of local services.

We organise events and displays, invite prominent speakers, and give talks to local organisations, including schools and colleges.

We meet once a month in Muchos Nachos140 Whyke Rd, Chichester PO19 8HT (tel: 01243 785 009)

Meetings are from 7.30pm on the fourth Tuesday of the month. Instead of membership subscriptions, there is a £3 entrance charge for meetings with speakers (usual concessions).

If you would like to meet some local freethinkers and have a chat, please come along and join us at the next meeting. Look out for the poster above.

For more details, email Julian.

NOTE:
Being freethinkers there are many things secular humanists will not agree on, but there are some matters on which we do take a firm and unanimous stand. We do not condone prejudice of any sort. Nor do we hate religious people. Such views are entirely contrary to any humanist philosophy and we reserve the right to exclude any person promoting them.

The Science of Purpose 16th July 2012

ChichesterHumanistsTalkRobertStovold16thJuly2012debate

Robert Stovold of Brighton & Hove Humanists posed the question "What is purpose, and can science study it?"

He began by arguing that, whilst human purpose cannot be directly observed, it can be inferred by its effects. Although scientists have never seen an electron, they can infer its existence by its effect on observable phenomena. Religious apolgists like mathematician John Lennox believe that science cannot answer the big questions. Others believe in intelligent design, where inferences are made about the design of a creator by observing certain organisms. Paradoxically, John Lennox believes both.

Robert moved on to trash intelligent design using the analogy of a bridge to debunk the idea of "irreducibly complex" systems in nature. He strongly objects to teaching intelligent design as an alternative theory to evolution, as the latter explains the origin of irreducibly complex systems.

 

Religion, he argues, derives from childhood social experiences and a natural propensity to explain the world in human terms.

Robert described evolution based on the selection of random genetic mutations that are best adapted to the environment. And yet this mindless process gave rise to purpose in humans because it enables us to achieve our goals.

He ended the talk by considering the meaning of the universe. After considering one of the many paradoxes of a purposeful God, he suggested that the very question of the cause of the universe may be invalid ... if the universe is all that there is.

As usual, there was a lively discussion and some disagreement amongst members. But we all agreed that this was a most interesting talk.

 

Add comment



Anti-spam: complete the taskJoomla CAPTCHA

Remembrance Sunday Campaign

The Chichester Observer made a video and wrote an article covering the laying of a Humanist wreath after the main religious ceremony. A transcript of the speech can be downloaded here.

Read more

Facebook Page
Facebook Group
Twitter
Login